krajina
 

Courses

For a better understanding of the environmental humanities here are the outlines of some courses:

Introduction to Environmental Humanities

Prof. RNDr. Hana Librová, CSc., Department of Environmental Studies, Faculty of Social Studies, Masaryk University, Brno

The course outlines the inner logic of the environmental humanities and the links between individual courses in the curriculum.

The course gives an overview of so-called naturalistic changes in the history of the social sciences, and covers the basic concepts of evolutionary theories, ethology and biosociology. The main causes of the environmental crisis will be discussed from anthropological, demographic, technological, economic, and values perspectives. Also, possible remedies for the environmental crisis will be introduced.

Environmental Ethics

M.A. Bohuslav Binka, Ph.D., Department of Environmental Studies, Faculty of Social Studies, Masaryk University, Brno

Based on the so-called theory of fields, the course classifies the problems of ethics into those at the theoretical, mid-range, and practical levels. At the theoretical level, the course describes the development of ethical theories within the framework of the European cultural environment, problematic consequences of individual theories and the relationship between environmental ethics and ethics as such. In the mid-range section of the course, students become acquainted with the methodology of solving ethical problems, which will enable them to recognize the levels on which individual types of ethical problems can be solved. In the practical part of the course, students are shown individual examples of unethical behaviour that is difficult to recognize (manipulation, sophisticated fundamentalism, etc.), and they have the opportunity to deconstruct such behaviour. Examination: written test, oral exam.

Lifestyles and Environmental Problems

Prof. RNDr. Hana Librová, CSc., Department of Environmental Studies, Faculty of Social Studies, Masaryk University, Brno

The course investigates the possibilities and limitations of empirical research on so-called ecological consciousness. In particular, the course addresses reflections on value shifts in everyday lifestyles, such as shifts in choices of leisure activities, transport, and approaches to male and female roles. The course focuses on the phenomenon of voluntary simplicity.

Aesthetic Perception of Nature

Assoc. Prof. M.A. Karel Stibral, Ph.D., Department of Environmental Studies, Faculty of Social Studies, Masaryk University, Brno

The course acquaints students with the history of the formation of aesthetic attitudes toward nature and landscapes – from admiration for particular aesthetical objects in Classical times to admiration for landscapes in the modern era. The course reflects on the aesthetical relationship to nature and landscape in art, philosophy and aesthetics (Shaftesbury, Rousseau, Kant) and period natural sciences (e. g. naturphilosophy).

On the basis of these three areas the lectures describe the complex changes in nature perception in European culture through the 20th century, and the influence of these changes on the origins of efforts to protect nature. A lecture on parallel developments in the Far East adds a comparative perspective to the course.

Environmental Problems of Classical Civilizations

Assoc. Prof. PhDr. Lubor Kysučan, Ph.D., Department of Classical Philology, Faculty of Philosophy, Palacký University, Olomouc

The devastation of the environment and related economic and social crises led to the fall of many advanced civilizations. This seminar traces the history of environmental crises (especially those caused by humans), and their impact on the stability of classical civilizations such as Egypt, the Far East, Greece, Rome, and in Latin America.

Attention is also paid to past attempts to protect animals through religious taboos or environmental laws. Coursework is based on the reading of literary and archaeological sources from the time.

Lifestyle at the Twilight of the Roman Empire

Assoc. Prof. PhDr. Jarmila Bednaříková, CSc., Institute of Classical Studies, Faculty of Philosophy, Masaryk University, Brno

Assoc. Prof. PhDr. Lubor Kysučan, Ph.D., Department of Classical Philology, Faculty of Philosophy, Palacký University, Olomouc

The end of Roman civilisation represents a model example of a civilisation in crisis. The fundamental characteristics of life at the twilight of the Roman Empire will be discussed, which is to some degree analogous to the contemporary global crisis – as can be seen in the state of the economy, the decline of civic society, a deepening gap between the rich and the poor, the relationship of the state towards the poor and the rich, consumer lifestyle, the crisis of traditional religion, new religious trends and new life values, cosmopolitanism and xenophobia, clashes and mutual influence of different cultures.

Attention is also paid to the solutions proposed for addressing the crises in ancient society as inspiration for solutions to the present situation. In seminars, various accounts of classical authors are read and discussed, and several thematic videos are shown.

An overview of all courses